Friday Faves is our weekly blog series highlighting a few select pieces from the REG team’s reading lists. You can catch up on past Friday Faves on the archive

Driving Remote Innovation Through Conflict and Collaboration

Anne says: I think we’re all familiar with these commonly heard laments over the last year of pandemic disruptions: “When we’re all working remotely, we can’t innovate”. “You can’t be spontaneous”. “We’ve lost the serendipity of bumping into people”. The authors of this article set out to investigate how some organisations were achieving innovation, remotely.

Their findings revealed two complementary principles for remote innovation:

  • Connecting for collaboration
    One-on-one connections and conversations are essential for building the collaborative trust that underpins innovation in remote teams“.

  • Connecting for contradiction
    To achieve the tension and debate necessary for innovation in remote workplaces, leaders must deliberately polarize perspectives, juxtaposing and exaggerating different or opposing views, and enable individuals to see the bigger picture”.

The article describes some activities practised by the organisations interviewed for the study. The examples go far beyond Zoom fatigue, back-to-back scheduled video meetings. When you consider the simplicity of their strategies, you wonder why everyone isn’t doing this? The article doesn’t attempt to answer that question, and it’s a bigger discussion topic than can be presented here – but I found it challenged me to consider the effectiveness of current meetings. Perhaps it’s a simple framework to guide meeting purpose – if we’re wanting to innovate, then are we wanting to collaborate, have we built relationships? Have we looked at different perspectives? Have we explored the contradiction?

If you’ve been innovating effectively recently, we’d be keen to hear your strategies and perspectives on what makes them successful.

Read: https://sloanreview.mit.edu/article/driving-remote-innovation-through-conflict-and-collaboration/

Loneliness

Jakkii says: I’m going really left field today because… well, because I can! I do think it’s an important issue, though, and something that can affect any of us.

Loneliness has been a growing health concern in western societies, particularly for the elderly, and the pandemic has only heightened this disquiet through increased isolation for far greater numbers of people during quarantines, lockdowns, travel restrictions and social distancing. There are a lot of people thinking and talking about this subject, as any Google search will show, from WIRED taking a look at The weird science of loneliness and our brains, through to the ABC’s The Signal podcast exploring whether we need a Minister for Loneliness. In Denmark, organisations are banding together to launch a collective fight against loneliness.

The article I’m sharing this week, Why is making friends so hard?, looks at the roots of loneliness and considers what solutions there might be. It’s a long piece that ultimately focuses in on friendship. It offers more a collection of short pieces of information and stories than it does a cohesive argument or real answers, but there’s quite a bit of food for thought here for mine.

This piece may not have all the answers, but I think it’s more important than ever that we be aware of loneliness and its effects, and make efforts when we can to reach out to and connect with others, from small interactions through to nurturing our strong friendships. That benefits us, of course, but it also benefits others, which includes not just people in our personal lives but in our work lives, as well.

Read: https://www.ozy.com/the-new-and-the-next/why-is-making-friends-so-hard/428214/

Friday Fives

Hybrid workplace

Remote work and the digital workplace

Community management, moderation and misinformation

Privacy and data

Big tech

Facebook

Social media

Extras

This is interesting: 20 Nintendo games that changed history

Things that make you go hmmm: NYPD stirs cyberpunk fears with robot dog

Space: The most intimate portrait yet of a black hole

Podcast: Tech Won’t Save Us: Bursting the NFT bubble with Jacob Silverman

Friday playlist: Happy Beats

Sydney Business Insights – The Future, This Week Podcast

This week: as the world sets out to regulate gig work, we look at its surprising consequences and wider impact.

Sandra Peter (Sydney Business Insights) and Kai Riemer (Digital Disruption Research Group) meet once a week to put their own spin on news that is impacting the future of business in The Future, This Week.

The stories this week

09:44 – A new deal for Uber drivers in UK renews debates about gig work

Listen: https://sbi.sydney.edu.au/unpacking-the-gig-economy-impact-on-the-future-this-week/


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